Digitizing back-issues

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elbaek
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 1:51 am
Location: Denmark
Contact:

Digitizing back-issues

Postby elbaek » Tue Mar 07, 2006 8:05 am

We have been loading up back-issues into four journals in OJS and it works great. Starting with the newest issues first we have now come to an end with the digital ones and we will need to do some kind of digitization of the older print only issues. Therefore:

1. Does anyone have or know of a best practice for scanning and digitizing journals?
2. What is the minimum set up for doing it yourself? Can we do it on our office scanner or do we need something more professional?

We would be very thankful to here your experiences out there.

- Mikael K. Elbæk
Copenhagen Business School Library
Ejournal@cbs http://ej.lib.cbs.dk

mjordan
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 10:59 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

Postby mjordan » Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:11 pm

Hi Mikael,

We have scanned a number of journals. The easiest way to do this would be to scan directly into Adobe Acrobat (the application, not the free reader) at black and white, 300 dots per inch. Then apply Acrobat's Capture feature to each file to make the files seachable and to reduce the file size.

You could use a regular office scanner, but it will take you some time. Basically, with scanners you pay for speed, but unless you need a scanner upgrade anyway or will be doing a lot of journals, you may not want to pay for a higher-end scanner. I strongly recommend sacrificing a run of issues by cutting the spines off them. This will make scanning a lot easier, particularly if you have a scanner with an Automatic Document Feeder (ADF). Even if you don't have an ADF, scanning unbound pages is still faster and more consistent than scanning bound journals.

We do this type of scanning on a cost-recovery basis, so if you'd rather have someone else take care of digitizing than doing it yourself, let me know.

elbaek
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 1:51 am
Location: Denmark
Contact:

Postby elbaek » Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:11 am

Thanks for you reply mjordan.

Although I have been told be people at the national library here in Copenhagen, DK that using Adobe Destiller would be a great sin, e.g. you need to do it the hard way scanning to TIFFs, then some professional OCR and XML.

I am not really that concerned about preservation right now but more concerned about getting the articles online.

What is your standpoint on that?

mjordan
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 10:59 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

Postby mjordan » Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:44 am

I disagree. Using Adobe Acrobat is the easy way, not the hard way. If you just want to get the articles online, scanning directly into Adobe Acrobat (i.e., not TIFFs, no XML) and using the built-in Capture OCR is the way to go. This is precisely how we are doing our university's retropsective and current theses, and it is very cost effective provided you have a scanner with an Automatic Sheet feeder and you can unbind journal issues to put them through the feeder (although we do not unbind our retropective theses).


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