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versions file names

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versions file names

Postby Liz Jackson » Wed Nov 02, 2005 11:37 am


I was wondering how the version files are named: is there any logic to the numbering system? I can make sense of the label changes from editor's version to copyediting, etc., but I was just wondering why/how the numbers in the file name are chosen. Is it random?


Liz Jackson
Liz Jackson

Postby asmecher » Wed Nov 02, 2005 11:55 am

Hi Liz,

I assume you're referring to filenames within the system, e.g. "63-78-1-PB.html"?

If so, they're assigned as follows:
  • The first number is the article's database ID ("articles" table)
  • The second number is the file ID ("article_files" table)
  • The third number is the revision ("article_files" table)
  • The two two letters at the end identify the type of file:
    • SM = Submission,
    • RV = Review,
    • ED = Editor,
    • CE = Copyedit,
    • LE = Layout,
    • PB = Public (published),
    • SP = Supplementary File,
    • NT = Note.
  • The file maintains the original extension from the system from which it was uploaded.

In the above example, the file is a public file belonging to article ID 63. Its entry in the article_files table can be found by looking at file_id 78, revision 1.

You'll see revisions come into play when a file is updated without passing from one section of the system to another. For example, the Author could revise the original submission file, resulting in a new revision with the same article and file IDs but an incremented revision number.

Note that the filenames are never used to determine the IDs of the database entries they belong to, or vice versa -- they're arbitrarily assigned, and once assigned, they're maintained via the file_name column of the article_files table. As long as the value of the file_name column matches the actual filename, the files can be named anything.

Alec Smecher
Open Journal Systems Team
Posts: 10015
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:56 pm

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