Bug 2639 - field containing journal name is missing in export to bibliographic software
field containing journal name is missing in export to bibliographic software
Status: NEW
Product: OJS
Classification: Unclassified
Component: Reading Tools
3.1
Other other
: P1 minor
Assigned To: PKP Support
http://w4.ub.uni-konstanz.de/srm/index
Depends on:
Blocks:
  Show dependency treegraph
 
Reported: 2007-02-04 11:32 PST by Rainer.Schnell
Modified: 2013-05-29 15:07 PDT (History)
1 user (show)

See Also:
Version Reported In:
Also Affects:


Attachments

Note You need to log in before you can comment on or make changes to this bug.
Description Rainer.Schnell 2007-02-04 11:32:03 PST
This is not a bug, but an omission. An important one, I think.
A field containing journal name is missing in export to bibliographic software, 
only the Endnote filter omit the journal name. Thanks. (sorry, I don't know version, machine or OS. I'm the editor, not the administrator.) 

Example:

On Screen everything is fine:
"Heerwegh, D., Abts, K., & Loosveldt, G. 2007 Jan 29. Minimizing survey refusal and noncontact rates: do our efforts pay off?. Survey Research Methods [Online] 1:1. Available: http://w4.ub.uni-konstanz.de/srm/article/view/46/45"
on Endnote export the Journal is missing:
"%A Dirk Heerwegh
	%A Koen Abts
	%A Geert Loosveldt
	%D 2007
	%T Minimizing survey refusal and noncontact rates: do our efforts pay off?
	%B 2007
	%9 Survey research; nonresponse rate; nonresponse error; data quality
	%! Minimizing survey refusal and noncontact rates: do our efforts pay off?
	%K Survey research; nonresponse rate; nonresponse error; data quality
	%X This study investigates the link between the effort undertaken to collect survey data and the nonresponse error on a key survey estimate. For this purpose a threefold analysis was conducted. First, the level of nonresponse error and its composition is charted. Second, it is investigated whether these levels change throughout the fieldwork period. This helps answering the question whether collecting more data implies higher data quality. This type of analysis also provides a possible framework for a dynamic process control during the fieldwork period. A third and final analysis links interviewer efforts (in terms of number of contact attempts) to nonresponse error and its composition. The results show that error due to noncontact is 2.6 times higher than error due to refusal, even though the refusal rate is almost two times higher than the noncontact rate. Also, the results suggest that collecting more data does not necessarily imply higher data quality and that a higher number of contact attempts does not markedly reduce the nonresponse error in absolute terms. The analysis uncovers the underlying process responsible for this latter finding.
	%U http://w4.ub.uni-konstanz.de/srm/article/view/46/45"

Both RIS-Exports are okay:
	
"	TY  - JOUR
	AU  - Dirk Heerwegh
	AU  - Koen Abts
	AU  - Geert Loosveldt
	PY  - 2007
	TI  - Minimizing survey refusal and noncontact rates: do our efforts pay off?
	JF  - Survey Research Methods; Vol 1, No 1 (2007)
	Y2  - 2007
	KW  - Survey research; nonresponse rate; nonresponse error; data quality
	N2  - This study investigates the link between the effort undertaken to collect survey data and the nonresponse error on a key survey estimate. For this purpose a threefold analysis was conducted. First, the level of nonresponse error and its composition is charted. Second, it is investigated whether these levels change throughout the fieldwork period. This helps answering the question whether collecting more data implies higher data quality. This type of analysis also provides a possible framework for a dynamic process control during the fieldwork period. A third and final analysis links interviewer efforts (in terms of number of contact attempts) to nonresponse error and its composition. The results show that error due to noncontact is 2.6 times higher than error due to refusal, even though the refusal rate is almost two times higher than the noncontact rate. Also, the results suggest that collecting more data does not necessarily imply higher data quality and that a higher number of contact attempts does not markedly reduce the nonresponse error in absolute terms. The analysis uncovers the underlying process responsible for this latter finding.
	UR  - http://w4.ub.uni-konstanz.de/srm/article/view/46/45"
Comment 1 Alec Smecher 2013-05-29 15:07:25 PDT
RT overhaul needs to happen first.